Culture Matters: Thrash Metal

A sub genre that derived from the British new wave heavy metal elegance and punk rock’s raw and rather fast paced style, thrash is pure excitement and energy. Its culture is surrounded by certain misconceptions due to its apparent brutality, however, its complex composition along with its insightful lyrical poetry, show us that thrash metal is an art. Maybe not everybody’s cup of tea, but defiantly admirable and at times even underrated by many.

Beyond the sub genre’s inner conflict, there is something really beautiful engraved in its fast paced beats, shredding guitar style and free-willed lyrics. Dive into the world of thrash metal, at least during this video and perhaps learn something new.

 

You thought punk was all? Well NOW you’ve got HORROR PUNK

The sub-genre that is bound to make your stomach churn. It still includes the unbeatable and undeniable elements that punk essentially has, but spookier. It all lays in the mortifying lyrics tainted by the rockabilly-casually sounding tunes. You might find yourself facing some type of juxtaposition with horror punk due to the clash between the upbeat sounding music and the morbid subjects that it speaks about. Horror punk also shows itself in the aesthetics of the bands that are considered horror punk, for example, take into account The Misfits’ funky hairdos and make-up. It’s pretty distinguishable that they’re most likely doing it to scare the crap out of you.

Some people could look at horror punk and ask themselves if certain musicians that they listen to such as Alice Cooper, who are notorious for indulging themselves in this spooky type of atmosphere that horror punk emits, could go under this category of horror punk. The thing to really consider here is that horror punk is an aspect of music (especially in its aesthetics) that can be so influential. Alice Cooper could or could not know what horror punk is, same as many other musicians, despite that there is a possibility of them actually coming across horror punk in its direct and original format and influencing their own style as an artist. I don’t know, I haven’t asked Alice Cooper, but I should.

Indulge your brain cells into this video that discusses horror punk, its origins as well as its unique ways. One of a kind, there isn’t too much about horror punk on the internet, so sink your fangs and claws into this.

DIIV release three new songs off their new album ‘Is The Is Are’

DIIV release three new songs off their new album ‘Is The Is Are’

 

Their much anticipated album ‘Is The Is Are’ is due for release in 2016 following up their debut album ‘Oshin’. It’s about time as it has been about two years already. The band have said that their new material is far more dark than their previous stuff. The song ‘Bent (Roi’s Song)’ is catchy and sharp with its guitar riffs, it definitely features some of that initial sound that DIIV unleashed in their debut album but with more maturity and tension, especially at the beginning of the song. ‘Mire (Grant’s Song)’ is quite the shocker though, because that’s where we get to see that darkness that DIIV are talking about. The vocals in this song seem to drone on in a haunting manner along with the gorgeous guitar lines.

 

To be honest ‘Mire (Grant’s Song)’ is probably the most emotional piece that the band have released, it’s actually one of my favourite songs by DIIV up to now. You’ve just got to admire the resemblance that they have to Sonic Youth here, it works out so well for them. They have a similar thing going on in their other new single ‘Dopamine’ but it is just as upbeat as ‘Bent (Roi’s Song)’. ‘Mire (Grant’s Song)’ stands out a lot and creates suspense for the rest of the other songs that are yet to be released. Below you’ll find the track listing for their upcoming album.

 

‘Out of Mind’

‘Under the Sun’

‘Bent (Roi’s Song)’

‘Dopamine’

‘Blue Boredom’ (w/ Sky Ferreira)

‘Valentine’

‘Yr Not Far’

‘Take Your Time’

‘Is The Is Are’

‘Mire (Grant’s Song)’

‘Incarnate Devil’

‘(Fuck)’

‘Healthy Moon’

‘Loose Ends’

‘(Napa)’

‘Dust’

‘Waste of Breath’